Walking on the moon

Posted on August 18th, 2009 by george.
Categories: film, future, history, photography, space, technology, youtube.

via WIRED

Ever watch those old videos and wonder why the Apollo astronauts developed a loping gait when walking on the moon?  Turns out the spacesuit, being inflated like a balloon, helped support its own 220-pound weight.  The internal pressure also made it difficult to bend the joints of the suit.  When the knee did bend, however, it would spring back, providing an extra pep in each step.  This combined with the low lunar gravity meant that the transition speed (the point where humans break into a run from walking) for a suited Apollo astronaut was much lower on the moon.  Hence the moonwalkers skipped, bounced and loped across the lunar surface at speeds where we earth-bound humans would simply stride.  With any luck this discovery will be brought to bear on the design of Martian spacesuits.

BONUS:  I just realized the music video for the Police’s Walking on the Moon was shot on location here at the Kennedy Space Center, back when the unused Saturn V rocket was on display outside the VAB, rusting away until it was restored and placed in a dedicated museum down the road.

2 comments.

Lorenia

Comment on August 18th, 2009.

hahaha Amazing.

Mom

Comment on August 19th, 2009.

Very interesting. Thanks for the explanation. I always wondered why the astronants had a weird kind of walk on the moon. I remember asking, “Teacher, why do the astronants walk like that?” And the answer I got was, “Because the moon’s gravity is less than on earth.” That answer never quite satisfied. Thanks for clearing that up! ;)

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